Concussion in California Law

Concussion is a serious concern for anyone, especially in sports; so much so that California legislators thought it was a good idea to pass a law about it.

Most people consider concussion as not such a big deal, but it is in fact an injury to the brain. True, some concussions are mild and patients eventually recover enough to go back to their normal activities, but any injury to the brain is always worrisome. Very little is known about the brain even in this day and age, and to say with any certainty that an injury to the brain today will not have an effect several years down the road is being cocky, to say the least. Such injuries can have life-changing consequences.

Concussion is unfortunately a common occurrence in contact sports such as football. To limit the damage at least to the young, California Governor Jerry Brown signed a law that would take effect in 2015 that regulates full-contact practice in middle- and high-school football to 90 minute sessions for a maximum of twice a week in the off-season. Any player who suffers a head injury is compelled to retire from practice until thoroughly examined and given the green light by a licensed health professional. It is not a significant protection for these literally young minds, but it’s a start. Reports of concussion among high school football players had been on the rise.

But that doesn’t address the issue of concussion in college and pro football players, and who is liable for it the player sustains serious injury. About 36% of college football players suffer multiple concussive events, and many continue to play despite the injury.

If a third party neglects to pull a player from the field for a suspected concussion and the player sustains serious traumatic brain injury, that individual may be held responsible. Consult with a personal injury or car accident lawyer in your state for assistance in this matter.

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